The Romans in London

In partnership with Jenny Hall, former senior curator of the Roman section at the Museum of London, who helped secure access to the key Roman remains in the City of London and access to artefacts in the Museum of London Archaeological Archive.

London Grid for Learning has created a comprehensive resource about the Romans in London. The project has been created in partnership with Jenny Hall, former senior curator of the Roman section at the Museum of London, who helped secure access to the key Roman remains in the City of London and access to artefacts in the Museum of London Archaeological Archive.

The resource contains 100 videos and over 50 high resolution images all presented within a complimentary online interface for younger learners.
The Romans in London
The Romans in London screenshot
The Romans in London screenshot

The Romans in London screenshotOptimised for Mobile Devices

The Romans in London features LGfL’s latest video delivery system which allows playback on mobile devices including iPad’s and iPhones. The resource also features an interactive map of Roman London – with Googlemaps integration and Streetview showing the major Roman find sites. This simple tool allows any child in any location in London to explore the Roman Legacy wherever they live or go to school.
Bob Usher – LGfL Content Manager: "The Romans in London represents a culmination of 10 months of resource gathering and development. We have been very fortunate to have the most knowledgeable person available on the subject, who has worked tirelessly to ensure that her knowledge is best used to support London’s school children. The project also represents a further refinement of the new LGfL resource delivery platform – first seen on ‘The Royal Mews at Buckingham Palace’. We hope that London’s teachers and learners can truly immerse themselves in London’s Roman legacy and appreciate the impact it continues to have on our daily London lives. We are very grateful to all those people and organisations that have supported the development of this unique resource


Jenny Hall Former senior curator of the Roman section – Museum of London: "What better way to learn about Roman London than by viewing where Roman Londoners lived, what they did and wore nearly 2000 years ago. Watch re-enactment group Britannia bring Roman London's gladiators to life; find out what London's archaeologists can tell from what is found and kept for future research and see how the Museum of London has re-created and illustrated Roman London. This resource is more than just a museum visit."  


Belinda Evans - Curriculum Consultant to the project: "We have complimented the rich video and image archive with a comprehensive set of curriculum linked material. From Gladiatorial battle ‘Top cards’ activities, to cooking Roman recipes, writing the diary of a legionary soldier guarding the London City wall, there are activities to suit a range of ages and learning styles."  


John Laker – Website designer - Atomwide: "This project has provided a unique opportunity to design an interface that not only provides and efficient and effective route into the wealth of resources, but also enhances the content itself. The Greater London Roman Map resource a good example of how we have harnessed the power of technology to achieve an educational outcome. We set out to support the current school age population in being able to explore what the Roman legacy is around their everyday locations in London. The interactive map allows this in a way that only online technology can deliver."  
High quality video resources include:
  • Gladiatorial battle re-enactments
  • The major Roman remains in the City of London including:
  • The Roman city wall at St Alphege Gardens and Tower Hill
  • The Roman Amphitheatre at the Guildhall Art Gallery
  • The Roman Fort Gate at London Wall
  • The Roman House and Baths at Billingsgate
  • The Roman Temple of Mithras at Queen Victoria Street
  • Replicas and real artefacts uncovered from archaeological discoveries in London
  • High resolution images
  • High resolution photographs courtesy of Museum of London Picture Library and Museum of London Archaeology
  • Reconstructions of what Roman London might have looked like, maps and images of artefacts courtesy of Museum of London Picture Library

The resources are structured into the following sections

  1. The Roman invasion and the army

  2. Boudica & the growth of Roman settlements in London area

  3. Everyday life

  4. Baths & entertainment

  5. Religion

  6. Transport, trade & industry